March 21, 2008

Dems' Denver DNC Could Backfire, Turn State Red; City Can't Handle DNC; Protestors "Duty Bound" To Destroy Democrats If Obama Not The Nominee

The great irony is that the choice of Denver was a political calculation to show a state that had turned (in the minds of the party bosses) from red to blue. The end result will likely be to to turn the state back to red...."--Campaign Spot

"It won’t be the chaotic street protest and battle with the cops that occurred in ’68: we’ve learned too much from that. It will be organized, Gandhian in its adherence to discipline and nonviolence, and more massive than anything maybe ever seen in the United States’ long history of social movements. If the party leaders choose to destroy democracy by denying the fair-and-square winner the nomination, democracy will then be duty bound to destroy the party"--Campaign Spot


First, the city's ability to handle the DNC is in question, says one observer from the Campaign Spot at NRO (h/t Ben DeGrow):
Regardless of whether the convention turns into a repeat of 1968, with filthy hippie war protesters camping out on the state capitol grounds and the large public park in front of the city and county buildings across Broadway Blvd. (which are, incidently [sic], only about two blocks away from the Pepsi Center and big hotels the delegates will be staying at)[--more like a mile, ed.], the whole experience promises to be a circus and a fiasco the city of Denver has never seen in its history. The flawed nominating process this year will play no small role in this. That is assuming it doesn't turn into Los Angeles 2000 for the Democrats, in which case it will be something far worse for both the city (and its Democrat mayor) and the state (with a new, supposedly law and order Democrat Governor). Denver is not equipped to handle any convention scenario other than a coronation, and certainly not the most (potentially) contentious national convention in 40 years.
. . .
Having lived in Denver, Seattle, and Los Angeles, I assure you Denver is a lot more like Seattle than it is Los Angeles. Perhaps the law enforcement officials and Democrat officeholders in Denver will rise to the occassion and find the magic formula to keep the city from breaking under the critical mass of the crush of media, Democrat delegates, liberal celebrities, left-wing activists, unions, and the teeming hordes of war protestors, but I would bet not.

At the end of the day, not only did the DNC make a hash of their nominating process, but they also chose a city that will be ill-equipped to deal with the convention circus to officially nominate the eventual candidate. Even the newly returning students for the fall semester from Boulder, Fort Collins, and the other assorted colleges in the area will be enough street activists in Denver to give the locals headaches that week.

The great irony is that the choice of Denver was a political calculation to show a state that had turned (in the minds of the party bosses) from red to blue. The end result will likely be to to turn the state back to red....
Read it all.

Denver Democrats and other civic leaders assured both the DNC planners and the citizens of Denver that the city was capable of handling a large gathering of political activists, party delegates, and national and international media.

What it didn't bargain for was the potential for a contentious, attention-amplifying, possibly brokered convention, or the onslaught of local and national protest groups, at least not to the level that perhaps my be encountered come August.

Denver's urban center is compact, but not as high density as the larger cities listed above. There is the clear potential for traffic bottlenecks, as I-25 and Speer/Colfax are closed, even temporarily and even if the convention was merely a coronation of the eventual party nominee. This doesn't account for the security zone established around the Pepsi Center, the various activist groups inhabiting the city's parks, and the general mayhem that might ensue should groups like Recreate '68 or the anarchists actually carry out their plans to effectively shut the city down.

Locals are already planning on avoiding Denver like the plague, scurrying to the area foothills, joining their friends in the suburbs, or taking a vacation. CU-Denver, where I am currently enrolled pursuing MBA/MS-Marketing degrees and which is located directly across from the Pepsi Center, will be completely shuttered for the entire week.

There was no city-wide referendum on bringing the Democratic National Convention to Denver, only promises made that we richly deserved it because of the state's trend to "purple," and its geographical potential to attract votes in the Mountain West. Those who aren't fleeing that week will be monitoring the situation up close--observing and documenting the moonbat protestors' excesses, fact-checking the city on costs/cleanup/damages, and keeping track of the MSM and international media's reaction to our great city.
As if all that wasn't enough . . .

If Barack Obama doesn't get the nod at the DNC, then Democrats and activists--outside of the moonbats above--will march on Denver:
Call it Plan Jericho: Like Joshua of the Old Testament and his troops who circled the halls of the city, marched around it silently for six days, on the seventh day marched around it seven times more and then, on cue, sounded a horn to end the silence and shout all at once, toppled the walls, entered the city, and “killed” (the Bible says so literally, but this time it will be politically, not mortally) every man, woman and superdelegate – including any imposter they might “nominate” by imposition – that did not participate in the certain walk-out protest that will occur under their scenario and instead chooses to remain inside the hall.

It won’t be the chaotic street protest and battle with the cops that occurred in ’68: we’ve learned too much from that. It will be organized, Gandhian in its adherence to discipline and nonviolence, and more massive than anything maybe ever seen in the United States’ long history of social movements. If the party leaders choose to destroy democracy by denying the fair-and-square winner the nomination, democracy will then be duty bound to destroy the party.

The narrative of this campaign has created an opening for the triumph of a radical, non-electoral, political narrative if the electoral path becomes blocked by a handful of insiders that think they know better than us. The big news is that, for the first time in decades, a black-white alliance from the street will be possible: Montgomery 1955 meets Seattle 1999 in Denver 2008.
Just what Denver needs--More angry people.

Slightly off topic--why Colorado may be a tough state to poll.

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